Northwestern University and Evanston's Only Daily News Source Since 1881

The Daily Northwestern

Northwestern University and Evanston's Only Daily News Source Since 1881

The Daily Northwestern

Northwestern University and Evanston's Only Daily News Source Since 1881

The Daily Northwestern


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City Council To Decide Landmark Status Of Davis House

By Megan CrepeauThe Daily Northwestern

The Evanston City Council will debate whether to designate the house at 1414 Davis St. as an Evanston landmark at Tuesday night’s meeting.

The council must approve the city’s Preservation Commission’s suggestion to dub the property a landmark before any action can be taken. The Preservation Commission determines whether buildings with unique qualities deserve landmark status, a designation for buildings that gives the sites extra protection from demolition, Ald. Elizabeth Tisdahl (7th) said.

Tisdahl said she would consider the issue carefully because the vote from the Preservation Commission was so close. The Preservation Commission recommended the house be designated a landmark by a 7-4 vote at their Jan. 16 meeting.

“I sort of tend to think it should (be passed), but I’m going to listen with an open mind,” she said.

The council will also vote on plans by three local restaurants to establish sidewalk cafes. The additions to the restaurants, which are Trattoria D.O.C., 706 Main St., Bat 17 at 1709 Benson St. and Linz & Vail at 2012 Central St., were recommended by the Site Plan and Appearance Review Committee.

Tisdahl said she hopes all three sites get approval, especially Linz & Vail, which is in her ward.

“They have really great gelato,” she said.

Tisdahl said she expected the council to approve all the bid proposals.

“I support them all,” she said. “We need to get more money into our infrastructure.”

The council will also consider a proposal to extend the moratorium on building in west Evanston for another 35 days. The council has already halted proposals for construction in the area in deference to Evanston’s overarching plan for West Side development.

If passed by the council, the plan will dictate what types of development will be allowed in the area. Parts of the West Side are in a Tax Increment Financing district, in which the city freezes the amount of property tax revenue given to schools and other government bodies; the increase in tax revenue created by new development is used for public works and capital improvements. The TIF district was established in September 2005, but the council imposed a moratorium to let residents of the West Side offer input on the future of development.

Ald. Steven Bernstein (4th) said the council will probably vote to continue the moratorium.

“My guess is, it’s passed,” he said.

Tisdahl shared Bernstein’s sentiments.

“We need a little more time to work on the West Side plan,” she said, adding that “it doesn’t make a lot of sense” to build there when plans for the area have not been finalized.

Reach Megan Crepeau at [email protected].

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City Council To Decide Landmark Status Of Davis House