Early voting opens for Illinois state primaries

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Daily file illustration by Jacob Fulton

Voters must bring a government-issued photo ID and vote in person for early voting. At the polling place, they can expect to vote on electronic touch screens.

Yiming Fu, Managing Editor

For Illinois voters who want to get ahead, polls for this year’s state primaries have opened for early voting. 

Polls are open for early voting June 13-27. The primary elections will take place on June 28. Residents must bring a government-issued photo ID and vote in person for early voting. At the polling location, voters will cast their ballots on electronic touch screens.

Here is a list of voting locations for suburban Cook County. Voters can enter their addresses into  ballotready.org to see which candidates will be on their ballots. 

For the 2022 midterm elections, every seat in the U.S. House of Representatives and about one-third of the seats in the U.S. Senate are up for grabs. Noteworthy races include efforts to elect Republican challengers against Gov. J.B. Pritzker and Sen. Tammy Duckworth. Jesse White’s seat will also be vacant. White, Illinois’ secretary of state, was first elected in 1998.

Many local seats are also up for re-election, and the results could influence everyday issues for constituents, including taxes, law enforcement and funding for schools. 

On the national level, the 2022 midterm elections are expected to pose a challenge for the Democratic Party, which currently holds a slim majority in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Illinois typically holds its primary elections in March, but state leaders voted to move it to a later date and wait for 2020 census data, which was used to draw voting maps.

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Twitter: @yimingfuu

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