Women’s Basketball: Abi Scheid’s career night serves as silver lining in loss to Buckeyes

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Daily file photo by Katie Pach

Abi Scheid attempts a shot. The freshman scored a career-best 20 points off the bench Tuesday.

Max Gelman, Reporter


Women’s Basketball


Though Northwestern came up short against Ohio State on Tuesday, freshman forward Abi Scheid wouldn’t let the Wildcats go down without a fight.

Scheid broke out against the Buckeyes (13-4, 3-0 Big Ten), shooting a perfect 7-of-7 from the field and notching career highs with 20 points and nine rebounds in the 94-87 loss. The Wildcats (13-3, 2-1) faced constant pressure from Ohio State, which burst out to an early lead behind seven 3-pointers in the first quarter. But Scheid’s performance helped NU stay within striking distance.

“I think the mistake I made was not getting her more shots,” coach Joe McKeown joked. “She’s a freshman that is learning our system, is really starting to get comfortable being on the floor with different players. I’m really proud of her, she did a great job.”

Scheid enjoyed the bulk of her success in the third quarter after the Cats fell behind 12 points at halftime. Facing a steep challenge, Scheid engineered a mini-comeback with back-to-back 3-point shots amid an 11-2 run that brought NU within two.

Scheid said her hot third quarter shooting was the result of her teammates creating opportunities.

“I had the easy job,” Scheid said. “I just had to stand there and get the kickout from my teammates. They would do the hard work and drive to the basket.”

Scheid’s usage has been on the rise recently, and her performance against Ohio State may mean more playing time in the future. Though senior center Allie Tuttle started Tuesday’s game, she spent just four minutes on the court, compared to Scheid’s career-high 31.

On the heels of Scheid’s career night, McKeown said the freshman’s versatility opens up many possibilities for her usage going forward.

“I might make her a shooting guard,” McKeown said. “I don’t know how you learn to shoot in Elk River, Minnesota, but somebody taught her pretty well. She can play everywhere … sort of like shortstop/second base, wherever you need her she jumps in.”

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