The Daily Northwestern

Tisdahl: ‘Brothel law’ talks could start this spring

Evanston Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl held her first Facebook town-hall Wednesday, answering questions submitted before and during the electronic exchange.

Courtesy of Facebook

Evanston Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl held her first Facebook town-hall Wednesday, answering questions submitted before and during the electronic exchange.

Edward Cox, Assistant City Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Evanston City Council expects to address the so-called “brothel law” this spring, Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl said Wednesday.

During a Facebook town hall, Tisdahl was asked what the city has done to work with Northwestern on the controversial over-occupancy rule, which says more than three unrelated people cannot live in the same housing unit.

“I’d hoped the council would have discussed it by now, but we are planning to discuss it further in the spring,” Tisdahl replied.

Aldermen briefly reviewed proposed reforms to the over-occupancy law at a meeting last fall but haven’t moved forward on the issue since then, despite an endorsement from University President Morton Schapiro.

Tisdahl answered more than two dozen questions during the hourlong Q-and-A, with topics ranging from the city’s climate for small businesses to town-gown relations.

“The 100 year war is over!” Tisdahl said in response to a question about whether the city gets along with the school. “I think we have an excellent relationship with NU that can only get better.”

In a separate reply, Tisdahl said her “least favorite responsibility” as mayor is also serving as the city’s liquor commissioner. In that dual role, Tisdahl has overseen several liquor license disputes, including one that ended in a controversial denial for the Tilted Kilt restaurant chain.

Tisdahl told The Daily after the virtual meeting she hopes social media can connect residents who don’t normally attend council meeting with their elected officials.

“We’re trying to be as transparent as possible, and we’re using everything we can think of to make that happen,” Tisdahl said.

— Edward Cox

Comments

About the Writer