Evanston schedules community meeting to discuss Divvy bikes

Residents+rent+Divvy+bikes+in+downtown+Chicago.+The+Chicago-based+bike-sharing+program+will+expand+to+Evanston+in+the+spring.
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Evanston schedules community meeting to discuss Divvy bikes

Residents rent Divvy bikes in downtown Chicago. The Chicago-based bike-sharing program will expand to Evanston in the spring.

Residents rent Divvy bikes in downtown Chicago. The Chicago-based bike-sharing program will expand to Evanston in the spring.

Alex Putterman/Daily Senior Staffer

Residents rent Divvy bikes in downtown Chicago. The Chicago-based bike-sharing program will expand to Evanston in the spring.

Alex Putterman/Daily Senior Staffer

Alex Putterman/Daily Senior Staffer

Residents rent Divvy bikes in downtown Chicago. The Chicago-based bike-sharing program will expand to Evanston in the spring.

Alex Putterman, Web Editor

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Before Divvy bikes arrive in Evanston, residents will have a chance to share input on the program at a community meeting Tuesday, the city announced last week.

In September, Gov. Pat Quinn’s office announced funding to expand Divvy, a Chicago-based bike-sharing service, to Evanston in spring of 2015. Eight docking stations will be installed throughout Evanston, possibly including some near Northwestern’s campus.

“It’s a really good opportunity to get more people riding bikes in that short commute from one part of downtown to another part of downtown,” Ald. Coleen Burrus (9th) told The Daily in November.

At Tuesday’s meeting, from 7-9 p.m. at the Civic Center, Divvy and Evanston officials will outline the program and allow residents to ask questions, voice concerns and vote on potential locations for the bike-sharing stations.

In partnership with the University, Evanston will offer students with WildCARDs $20 discounts off the $75 Divvy membership.

When Divvy’s expansion to Evanston was first agreed upon, Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl said the program will help improve residents’ health and reduce the city’s carbon footprint, and Quinn spoke to Divvy’s effectiveness in Chicago.

“The Divvy program has proven to be a successful and innovative way to commute, navigate congested city streets and explore vibrant Chicago communities,” Quinn said in a news release. “Expanding Divvy outside of the city limits means fewer cars on the roads and gives more residents and visitors the fun opportunity to take a ride.”

Evanston is currently looking for businesses to become partners or sponsors of the bike sharing program.

Email: asputt@u.northwestern.edu
Twitter: @AlexPutt02

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