Evanston Public Library creates new smartphone app

The+Evanston+Public+Library+released+a+new+mobile+app%2C+which+allows+library+patrons+to+access+many+of+the+library%27s+services+via+their+smartphones.
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Evanston Public Library creates new smartphone app

The Evanston Public Library released a new mobile app, which allows library patrons to access many of the library's services via their smartphones.

The Evanston Public Library released a new mobile app, which allows library patrons to access many of the library's services via their smartphones.

Source: Screenshot

The Evanston Public Library released a new mobile app, which allows library patrons to access many of the library's services via their smartphones.

Source: Screenshot

Source: Screenshot

The Evanston Public Library released a new mobile app, which allows library patrons to access many of the library's services via their smartphones.

Ciara McCarthy, Assistant City Editor

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The Evanston Public Library announced Tuesday that patrons can now access information about their paperback books on their smartphones.

A new app allows people to access many of the library’s services through their smartphones. Readers can search the library catalog, check their accounts, ask questions and find out about upcoming events. The app also has a BookCheck function that allows patrons to check out materials from anywhere in the library.

EPL spokeswoman Jill Schacter said one of the app’s most prominent features is BookLook Mobile, a feature that enables users to scan an item’s bar code to see if the library has the item. Someone browsing in a bookstore could use the app to find out if the library has the book before purchasing it, Schacter said.

Schacter said the mobile app is part of the library’s larger commitment to expanding its use of technology. The library is also looking into creating a digital learning lab that would have resources for patrons to develop necessary technological skills.

“Ideally, there would be ways for people to learn how to work with technology in a hands-on manner,” Schacter said.

Ciara McCarthy

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